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Matthew Campbell
Matthew Campbell

Three Bakers Bread Where To Buy _HOT_



After the grocery store, where I think you'll find lower prices, you can try your local health food store. Store bought gluten free bread options aren't actually a health food, but these types of stores tend to cater to niche products, which gf bread still sort of is.




three bakers bread where to buy



Mestemacher\'s ready to eat three grain natural bread with whole rye kernels is a whole-grain bread with no artificial preservatives or cholesterol. Each 17.6 oz loaf has about 7 servings of natural three grain bread with whole rye kernels. Our bread is freshly ground in our own mill from whole grains and ideal for a cholesterol conscious diet.


Gluten free. Gluten free baking from our family to yours. Certified gluten-free. 58% more than the leading gluten-free bread (58% more weight than leading gluten-free white and whole grain sandwich bread). All natural. Excellent source of fiber. Soy free. Dairy free. My father Joe stated his bakery in 1979 where my husband Dan and I baked until 2002 when I was diagnoses celiac. Dan, a master baker, began baking gluten-free for me and selling his products at the family bakery. Sales were so strong that we started our own dedicated gluten-free bakery. Our four children live in an exclusively gluten-free household so we want our products to be as tasty and nutritious as possible. Now we're offering them from our family to yours! -Jane Trygar. All products are made in a dedicated gluten-free facility. Visit us at www.threebakers.net for other gluten-free products.


How long this "temporary" bakery served is not evident, but there isno doubt that Chief Factor John McLoughlin soon desired to replace it.As visiting Samuel Parker observed late in 1835, the fort bakery notonly had to supply the bread for daily use at the post but also seabiscuit for the Company's vessels in the Pacific and for the forts onthe Northwest Coast. In this task, he reported, two or three men were in"constant employment." [2]


2. Earthgrains and Metz are two of only a few sellers of white pan bread in many local markets throughout Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska. In the metropolitan Kansas City, Missouri and Omaha, Nebraska areas, Earthgrains and Metz are two of the three largest and most significant producers and sellers of white pan bread, and they are two of the four largest and most significant producers and sellers of white pan bread in the metropolitan Des Moines, Iowa area. If the proposed acquisition is permitted, Earthgrains and one other competitor would produce white pan bread that accounts for about 95 percent of annual revenues from the sale of that product to consumers in the Kansas City market, and 98 percent of annual revenues from the sale of white pan bread to consumers in the Omaha market. Earthgrains and two other competitors would account for 95 percent or more of annual revenues from the sale of white pan bread to consumers in the Des Moines market.


12. Metz, a wholly owned subsidiary of Specialty Foods, is a Delaware corporation with its corporate headquarters in Sioux City, Iowa. Metz is one of the largest regional wholesale commercial bakers. It produces and sells white pan bread throughout the Midwest, primarily in Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, and Utah. In 1999, Metz's total revenues exceeded $600 million.


15. Wholesale commercial bakeries, such as those operated by defendants, typically produce white pan bread on automated, high-speed production lines. Wholesale commercial bakers produce more white pan bread than any other type of bread. About 50 percent of the bread produced and sold by defendants is white pan bread.


16. Wholesale commercial bakers and other firms also produce "variety breads." Variety breads include wheat, whole grain, potato, rye, raisin, pumpernickel, sourdough, French, Italian, and other types of specialty breads. As a rule, variety breads have denser, grainier textures, harder crusts, and a more pronounced taste, than white pan bread.


22. The relevant geographic markets for purposes of analyzing this transaction are numerous local markets throughout Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska, the largest of which are the metropolitan Omaha, NE, Kansas City, MO, and Des Moines, IA areas. In these areas, retailers and consumers would not be able to substitute white pan bread sold by more distant bakers, and are likely to pay higher prices as a result of the acquisition.


24. It would be unprofitable for retail stores in a higher-priced area or zone to purchase bread from customers in a lower-priced area or zone and transport it to a higher-priced zone. Such diversion, or arbitrage, is not practical because of the short shelf life of white pan bread, the high cost of transporting white pan bread and the control that the bakers maintain over branded and private label sales of that product.


25. Customers in the Kansas City, MO metropolitan area are unlikely to shift their purchases to bakers that do not currently produce and sell white pan bread in the Kansas City area in the event of a small but significant increase in price of white pan bread sold to such customers. Thus, the metropolitan Kansas City, MO area is a relevant geographic market within the meaning of Section 7 of the Clayton Act.


26. Customers in the Omaha, NE metropolitan area are unlikely to shift their purchases to bakers that do not currently produce and sell white pan bread in the Omaha area in the event of a small but significant increase in price of white pan bread sold to such customers. Thus, the metropolitan Omaha, NE area is a relevant geographic market within the meaning of Section 7 of the Clayton Act.


27. Customers in the Des Moines, IA metropolitan area are unlikely to shift their purchases to bakers that do not currently produce and sell white pan bread in the Des Moines area in the event of a small but significant increase in price of white pan bread sold to such customers. Thus, the metropolitan Des Moines, IA area is a relevant geographic market within the meaning of Section 7 of the Clayton Act.


28. Customers in each of many other smaller communities in Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska are unlikely to shift their purchases to bakers that do not currently produce and sell white pan bread in their communities in the event of a small but significant increase in price of white pan bread sold to such customers. Thus, each of these smaller communities in Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska is a relevant geographic market within the meaning of Section 7 of the Clayton Act.


29. Earthgrains and Metz directly compete against one another to sell both branded and private label white pan bread, provide high quality and service, and develop improved products to and for their retail customers. This direct competition between Earthgrains and Metz benefits consumers through lower prices, better service, and improved products. If the combination of Earthgrains and Metz is permitted, this competition would be eliminated. Furthermore, Earthgrains and Metz are two of only three or four suppliers of white pan bread in each of the relevant geographic markets.


30. The proposed acquisition will reduce competition substantially in the sale of white pan bread in the Omaha market. Only three major firms sell white pan bread to retailers in the Omaha market. In this highly concentrated market, Metz has a share of about 49 percent; and Earthgrains has a share of about 8 percent. A combination of Earthgrains and Metz would account for at least 58 percent of retail sales of white pan bread in the Omaha market. Using a measure of market concentration called the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index ("HHI"), defined and explained in Appendix A, combining Earthgrains and Metz would substantially increase the already high concentration in the Omaha white pan bread market. Following the merger, the HHI would increase about 875 points to about 3800, well in excess of that which would raise significant antitrust concerns.


32. The proposed acquisition will reduce competition substantially in the sale of white pan bread in the Kansas City, MO market. Only three major firms sell white pan bread to retailers in the Kansas City market. In this highly concentrated market, Metz has a share of about 27 percent and Earthgrains has a 25 percent market share. A combination of Earthgrains and Metz would account for at least 52 percent of retail sales of white pan bread in the Omaha market. Following the merger, the HHI would increase 1378 points to about 3400, well in excess of that which would raise significant antitrust concerns.


36. The proposed acquisition will reduce competition substantially in the sale of white pan bread in many other communities in Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska. Currently, at best, only three major firms sell white pan bread to retailers in these smaller markets, and Metz and Earthgrains are two of the largest competitors. Combining Earthgrains and Metz would substantially increase the already high concentration in each of these white pan bread markets, and give the combined company a dominant share of each of these markets.


First up is a bread-based challenge, no doubt set by master of dough himself, Paul Hollywood, where the contestants will have to pull off a series of perfectly-formed loaves. Next up will be a biscuit bake, followed by a complex patisserie showstopper. 041b061a72


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